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10 Cloverfield Lane

When Michelle, a young woman, decides to leave her boyfriend (or husband, or fiancĂ©, this wasn’t exactly clear to me)she had no idea how drastically her life would suddenly change.
She decides to get the car and drive away, but meets with disaster on her way to wherever. Once she awakes, it’s mostly to confusion.
She has a drip in her arm, but is also tied to the wall with her knee, which is also bounded due to an injury that happened in the car accident.

This film is actually quite the mindfuck. Not in a constant thrilling way, but it defenitely has nontheless.
John Goodman is Howard, the guy who has saved Michelle, and John Gallagher Jr is Emmett, her co-survivor of what Howard tells them has been an attack. Emmett has seen it, Michelle is very sceptical about all of it.

Though they never truly become fully friends, they do find a way to live together in the bunker that Howard build. Michelle, whenever she finds a way to not believe something that Howard has come up with, Howard finds a way to prove her wrong and his own point. Still, you’re more on Michelle’s side, as Howard’s ideas are so eccentric or farfetched, if you will. You do feel trapped along with Michelle, but thankfully it’s quite easy to still relate to Howard, who has a strong personality, but is mostly just friendly in a fatherly way. Strict, but still loving, that is. It’s his main aim to keep everyone safe. So even if the children don’t behave, he gets upset, but he’s easy to calm down.

It’s really too bad that the last part of the film only takes that short. I feel the film deserved more than only those few minutes. It makes the slower middle part of the film quite pointless, actually.
Then again, it’s just a film.
It’s not bad, it’s just not the best you’ll ever see.

 
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Posted by on November 16, 2017 in Films, Opinion

 

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Snowcake (review)

Alex Hughes (greatly portrayed by the now late Alan Rickman) has the ‘fortune’ of running into a girl named Vivian at a highway restaurant. At first it seems like a coincedence she joins his table, but soon it appears this isn’t so. She is a hitchhiker who needs a ride back to her mother, and Alex Hughes seems like the best option, in her opinion.
Alex isn’t too charmed about this. He tells her immediately he just got out of prison for killing someone. Just to make clear to her that even though he seemed the best option for hitchhiking at first, not everybody is.
Vivian feels sort of uncomfortable immediately, but her spontaneous nature lets her to believe he is OK-people, so to say.

Then the accident happens. The afterlife of the accident covers all, or at least most of this film.

This film has a funny storyline which you wouldn’t find that quickly amongst ‘normal’ functioning people. Highly spontaneous people who don’t believe in bad people perhaps, but that’s about it.
ALan Rickman has the right face to look confused for the many weird interactions he has with Linda (marvellously played by Sigourney Weaver). The two of them are a perfect duet of sanity & insanity, but within the context of the psychological borders that come with those.

While Alex tries to get a grip on the life he was about to pursue when he was released from prison, Linda has to cope with the loss all of her loved ones show for the loss of her daughter. Because of her autism, she is dealing with this in a far different way than anybody else.
Sigourney Weaver has made a proper study of this condition and therefor portrays this really well. In our family, we have someone with this condition and it was very recognisable.
The film is, dramatic as it is, a joy to watch because of the ridicule Linda puts in, with sidekicks Alan Rickman and Carrie-Ann Moss for the usual human interactions people deal with at such a time.
Basically, it’s a small town losing its favourite daughter.
Lovely. Go see!

 
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Posted by on January 14, 2016 in Films, Opinion, Uncategorized

 

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