RSS

Tag Archives: Sigourney Weaver

The Village & Doubt

Two films that seem very different, but actually have quite a lot in common.

The Village is about a small community -they clearly used the Amish as an example- that lives on fear. The children are being brought up with fear that if they do anything around the borders of the village, it will be at great costs. They should just follow the rules, and as soon as someone does something that the elderly have warned them about, terrible things happen. It isn’t a real horror film, so not THAT drastic, but pretty bad anyway.

Doubt is about a convent/school, ran by nuns and priests. This is immediately one of the similarities with The Village: based on faith and the fear that is used for making children do what is believed to be ‘right’. Anyway. One of the nuns notices some odd behaviour with one of the pupils and reports this. This leads to further investigation and nicely stirs up an otherwise so calm and nice atmosphere within the walls of the school.

Both films strongly thrive on the fear that is created within the faith they believe. It connects, but also leads to the road that is believed to be the only right one.

Both films have very strong leader characters. In The Village it’s Joaquin Phoenix, Bryce Dallas Howard, Adrien Brody, Sigourney Weaver and William Hurt, in Doubt it’s Meryl Streep, Amy Adams, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Viola Davis and Alice Drummond. Both films deliver a classact when it comes to showing the fear, and both films disappoint in showing what the fear is all about.
Meryl Streep does best, which is not that surprising, by being a steadfast tin soldier, in a way. Very convinced at first about what is the right thing to do, then, as the title says, doubts.

The costumes are very much in touch with the community the storylines were based upon, though Amy Adams and Meryl Streep do look a bit like walking-around-lampposts, but still.

I’m someone who likes to see a thrill being fullfilled and neither film does that, but the acting, especially in Doubt, is a joy to watch. And yet, both films make you feel like you’ve just lost sensable time watching Jaws only being a goldfish with attitude.

Advertisements
 
Leave a comment

Posted by on April 19, 2016 in Films, Opinion

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Snowcake (review)

Alex Hughes (greatly portrayed by the now late Alan Rickman) has the ‘fortune’ of running into a girl named Vivian at a highway restaurant. At first it seems like a coincedence she joins his table, but soon it appears this isn’t so. She is a hitchhiker who needs a ride back to her mother, and Alex Hughes seems like the best option, in her opinion.
Alex isn’t too charmed about this. He tells her immediately he just got out of prison for killing someone. Just to make clear to her that even though he seemed the best option for hitchhiking at first, not everybody is.
Vivian feels sort of uncomfortable immediately, but her spontaneous nature lets her to believe he is OK-people, so to say.

Then the accident happens. The afterlife of the accident covers all, or at least most of this film.

This film has a funny storyline which you wouldn’t find that quickly amongst ‘normal’ functioning people. Highly spontaneous people who don’t believe in bad people perhaps, but that’s about it.
ALan Rickman has the right face to look confused for the many weird interactions he has with Linda (marvellously played by Sigourney Weaver). The two of them are a perfect duet of sanity & insanity, but within the context of the psychological borders that come with those.

While Alex tries to get a grip on the life he was about to pursue when he was released from prison, Linda has to cope with the loss all of her loved ones show for the loss of her daughter. Because of her autism, she is dealing with this in a far different way than anybody else.
Sigourney Weaver has made a proper study of this condition and therefor portrays this really well. In our family, we have someone with this condition and it was very recognisable.
The film is, dramatic as it is, a joy to watch because of the ridicule Linda puts in, with sidekicks Alan Rickman and Carrie-Ann Moss for the usual human interactions people deal with at such a time.
Basically, it’s a small town losing its favourite daughter.
Lovely. Go see!

 
Leave a comment

Posted by on January 14, 2016 in Films, Opinion, Uncategorized

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,